Foodprint

10/11/2020

Foodprint

Foodprint is an app. It connects consumers with eateries that have surplus and imperfect food that would otherwise be thrown out.

The app is a two-sided marketplace: each day eateries list and discount unsold food or food unlikely to sell. Via the app, users purchase that food and collect it in-store. The pick-up model encourages customers to eat locally and connects them to the kitchens and eateries preparing their meals. The benefit for participating eateries is that they can monetise what would otherwise become food waste – a circular solution.

In Aotearoa, cafés, restaurants and supermarkets produce more than 50,000 tonnes of food waste annually. Over 60% of that waste is avoidable because the food is still fit for human consumption.

Food waste is hugely damaging to the environment and expensive to the hospitality industry. Eateries that use Foodprint are clawing back up to $10,000 per annum.

 

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Raglan Food Co

28/10/2020

Raglan Food Co

Raglan Food Co creates delicious, dairy-free alternatives that are good for people and the environment. Founded on the principles on sustainability and fairness, the company is Toitū carbonzero certified, Living Wage certified and fwd: certified for social procurement. It is also working towards B Corporation certification.

Raglan Food Co is the largest dairy-free yoghurt brand in New Zealand. With 54% share of the domestic market, it produces more than 1.3 million jars of yoghurt per year. It also exports to Hong Kong and Singapore.

The company has created a profit share programme for all team members and a Health Fund of $5,000 per year to assist team members with their physical or mental health. It runs numerous local and national sustainability initiatives focused on education and the environment.

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Foodprint

28/10/2020

Foodprint is an app that connects consumers with eateries that have surplus or imperfect food that would otherwise be thrown out.

The app is a two-sided marketplace. Each day eateries list and discount unsold food or food unlikely to sell. Via the app, users purchase that food and collect it in-store. The pick-up model encourages customers to eat locally and connects them to the kitchens and eateries preparing their meals. The benefit for participating eateries is that they can monetise what would otherwise become food waste.

In Aotearoa, cafés, restaurants and supermarkets produce more than 50,000 tonnes of food waste annually. Over 60% of that waste is avoidable because the food is still fit for human consumption.

Food waste is hugely damaging to the environment and expensive for the hospitality industry. Eateries that use Foodprint are clawing back up to $10,000 per annum.

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Raglan Food Co

22/10/2020

Raglan Food Co is founded on principles of sustainability and fairness. With that in mind it wanted to ensure equality of wages and living standards for everyone in its team. Certified as a Living Wage organisation three years ago, it has gone a step further by putting in place a wage cap so the highest paid position within the organisation cannot be more than three times the amount of the lowest.

Raglan Food Co has created a profit share programme for all team members. Over the past year, it has developed a detailed employee handbook and improved the induction process. It has also put an extra emphasis on mental health with initiatives including a health fund of $5,000 per year to assist team members with their physical or mental health.

Raglan Food Co is Toitū carbonzero certified.

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Foodstuffs and CHEP

14/10/2020

Foodstuffs North Island is working closely with CHEP NZ, a sustainable logistics company, to ensure that consumer goods flow efficiently using a circular ‘share and reuse’ model. Wooden pallets are repaired multiple times and delivery crates are washed after every cycle before being delivered to manufacturers and growers to refill. The initiative is scalable and establishes a model for further collaboration.

Their latest initiative is transport collaboration. Rather than trucks dropping off goods and leaving empty, Foodstuffs and CHEP have analysed customer delivery routes and combined their needs so trucks always have a full load. The transportation collaboration is operational solely in the North Island but will be rolled out nationwide.

As a result of this initiative, in 2020 alone Foodstuffs and CHEP forecast there will be 1,100 fewer trucks on the roads; a reduction in 200,000 km travelled; a reduction of 75,000 litres of diesel; and 180 tonnes less CO2 generated.

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Food security

1.10.20

How do we create a food secure future?

Food banks are reporting record demand for their services this year. Due to the impacts of Covid-19 it is thought that up to one million Kiwis may be struggling to put enough food on the table. Last month SBN co-hosted a hui in Wellington focused on creating a food secure future for families living in the capital.

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Foodstuffs NZ

01/10/2020

Foodstuffs

Foodstuffs’ waste minimisation programme has been operating since 2014 and spans more than 130 sites across New Zealand.

The sites include New World and PAK’nSAVE stores, corporate offices and distribution centres. Collectively these sites divert about 85% of their total waste from landfill – that’s more than 3,000 tonnes per month. To date the programme has diverted about 200,000 tonnes from landfill and saved about 500,000 tonnes in CO2-e emissions entering the atmosphere. Additionally, Foodstuffs provides 8 million meals to local communities every year through its food rescue programme.

Until last year the waste minimisation programme focussed on waste segregation and diversion. Now it involves all waste streams, including recyclables and compostables. Foodstuffs is also shifting its focus to waste prevention rather than waste management. By transitioning to reusable crates to deliver goods to stores it has eliminated 18.5 million cardboard boxes per year. It has also removed 205 tonnes of plastic from its supply chain.

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